ICD-10Medical Billing and CodingMedisoft

It’s the holiday season….time to spread the Flu!

santa-hat

With all the weather changes we have experienced in the south over the past few months, getting the flu has been the last thing on anyone’s mind.  80 degree temps here in Kentucky in November is unheard of!  We’ve all been taking advantage of getting out in the fresh air (flu?  what flu?).

Well, now we are experiencing our first “Arctic Blast” and my first trip to Kroger this week resulted in witnessing probably the most embarrassing thing we as parents experience….projectile vomiting from a child in the grocery store.  Okay, maybe not the most embarrassing thing in the world but one that certainly had me running for the hand sanitizer and masks (no-I didn’t stick around to help).

And yes, remembering that in fact, the flu season is upon us.

Guidelines for Billing Influenza Vaccines

Medicare pays for one seasonal influenza virus vaccination per influenza season (12 months do not have to pass). Annual Part B deductible and coinsurance amounts do not apply for the influenza virus and the pneumococcal vaccinations. All physicians, non-physician practitioners, and suppliers who administer these vaccinations must take assignment on the claim for the vaccine.

Medicare will pay both administration fees when a beneficiary receives both the seasonal influenza virus and the pneumococcal vaccines on the same day. Report ICD-10-CM diagnosis code Z23 Encounter for immunization when an individual receives both vaccines, but report separate administration codes for the seasonal influenza virus (G0008) and pneumococcal (G0009) vaccines.

Medicare Payment Allowances for this flu season (8/1/2016-7/31/2017)

CPT® Code Payment Allowance
90630 Influenza split virus vaccine, quadrivalent (IIV4), preservative free, for intradermal use $20.343
90653 Influenza virus vaccine, inactivated, subunit, adjuvanted, for intramuscular use $37.383
90654 Influenza virus vaccine, split virus, preservative-free, for intradermal use Pending
90655 Influenza virus vaccine, trivalent (IIV3), split virus, preservative free, 0.25 mL dosage, for intramuscular use Pending
90656 Influenza virus vaccine, trivalent (IIV3), split virus, preservative free, 0.5 mL dosage, for intramuscular use $17.717
90657 Influenza virus vaccine, trivalent (IIV3), split virus, when administered to children 6–35 months of age, for intramuscular use Pending
90661 Influenza virus vaccine, trivalent (ccIIV3), derived from cell cultures, subunit, preservative and antibiotic free, 0.5 mL dosage, for intramuscular use Pending
90662 Influenza virus vaccine, split virus, preservative free, enhanced immunogenicity via increased antigen content, for intramuscular use $42.722
90672 Influenza virus vaccine, quadrivalent, live (LAIV4), for intranasal use $26.876
90673 Influenza virus vaccine, trivalent (RIV3), derived from recombinant DNA (RIV3), hemagglutinin (HA) protein only, preservative and antibiotic free, for intramuscular use $40.613
90674 Influenza virus vaccine, quadrivalent (ccIIV4), derived from cell cultures, subunit, preservative and antibiotic free, 0.5 mL dosage, for intramuscular use

*NOTE-Claims for this code must be held until 1/1/17

$22.936
90685 Influenza virus vaccine, quadrivalent (IIV4), split virus, preservative free, 0.25 mL dosage, for intramuscular use $26.268
90686 Influenza virus vaccine, quadrivalent (IIV4), split virus, preservative free, 0.5 mL dosage, for intramuscular use $19.032
90687 Influenza virus vaccine, quadrivalent (IIV4), split virus, when administered to children 6–35 months of age, for intramuscular use $9.403
90688 Influenza virus vaccine, quadrivalent (IIV4), split virus, 0.25 mL dosage, for intramuscular use $17.835

 

HCPCS Level II Code Payment Allowance
Q2035 Influenza virus vaccine, split virus, when administered to individuals 3 years of age and older, for intramuscular use (Afluria) $16.284
Q2036 Influenza virus vaccine, split virus, when administered to individuals 3 years of age and older, for intramuscular use (Flulaval) $16.284
Q2037 Influenza virus vaccine, split virus, when administered to individuals 3 years of age and older, for intramuscular use (Fluvirin) Pending
Q2038 Influenza virus vaccine, split virus, when administered to individuals 3 years of age and older, for intramuscular use (Fluzone) Pending
Q2039 Influenza virus vaccine, split virus, when administered to individuals 3 years of age and older, for intramuscular use (not otherwise specified) Flu Vaccine Adult – Not Otherwise Classified: Payment allowance is to be determined by the local claims processing contractor.

The payment allowance for some codes is still pending. Check the CMS website periodically for updates.

Resources:

https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Medicare-Fee-for-Service-Part-B-Drugs/McrPartBDrugAvgSalesPrice/VaccinesPricing.html

https://www.cms.gov/Outreach-and-Education/Outreach/FFSProvPartProg/Provider-Partnership-Email-Archive-Items/2016-12-08-eNews.html?DLPage=1&DLEntries=10&DLSort=0&DLSortDir=descending#_Toc468862699

 

 

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CMS Announces July 2015 Transition from IACS to EIDM

CMS 

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) would like to inform Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) participants and their staff to an important system update scheduled to be in place on July 13, 2015.


The Individuals Authorized Access to CMS Computer Services (IACS) system will be retired, but current IACS user accounts will transition to an existing CMS system called Enterprise Identity Management (EIDM). The EIDM system provides a way for business partners to apply for, obtain approval, and receive a single user ID for accessing multiple CMS applications.


Existing PQRS IACS users, their data, and roles will be moved to EIDM and will be accessible from the ‘PQRS Portal’ portion of the CMS Enterprise Portal at  http://portal.cms.gov. Users will then access the PQRS Portal to submit data, retrieve submission reports, view feedback reports, or conduct various administrative and maintenance activities. New PQRS users will need to register for an EIDM account.


Stay tuned for more information and resources in the coming weeks and months! In the meantime, please ensure that your IACS account is active, current, and you’re able to log in. This will help ensure a smoother transition to EIDM.


For additional assistance regarding IACS or EIDM, contact the QualityNet Help Desk at 1-866-288-8912 (TTY 1-877-715-6222) from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Central Time Monday through Friday, or via email at qnetsupport@hcqis.org. To avoid security violations, do not include personal identifying information, such as Social Security Number or TIN, in email inquiries to the QualityNet Help Desk.

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CMS Announces Extension for EPs participating in PQRS via EHR and QCDR (QRDA III format)

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is pleased to announce that the submission deadlines for the PQRS reporting methods below have been extended.  All other submission timeframes for other PQRS reporting methods remain the same.  The revised submission timeframes are:

Reporting Method Submission Period Submission Deadline Time

(All Times are Eastern)

EHR Direct or Data Submission Vendor that is certified EHR technology (CEHRT) 1/1/15 – 3/20/15 8:00 p.m.
Qualified clinical data registries (QCDRs) (using QRDA III format) reporting for PQRS and the clinical quality measure (CQM) component of meaningful use for the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program 1/1/15 – 3/20/15 8:00 p.m.

An Individuals Authorized Access to CMS Computer Services (IACS) account with the “PQRS Submitter Role” is required for these PQRS data submission methods. Please see the IACS Quick Reference Guides for specifics.

PQRS provides an incentive payment to individual eligible professionals (EPs) and group practices that satisfactorily participate or satisfactorily report data on quality measures for covered Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (PFS) services. Additionally, those who do not meet the 2014 PQRS reporting requirements will be subject to a negative payment adjustment on all Medicare Part B PFS services rendered in 2016.

Note:  The deadline listed above does apply to Individual Eligible Professionals and Group Practices participating in other CMS programs such as the Medicare EHR Incentive Program and Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative that are utilizing the reporting methods listed above. Additionally, CMS has extended the deadline for EPs wishing to attest to meaningful use for the EHR reporting period in 2014 for the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Program to March 20, 2015. Please be on the lookout for a separate listserv with information regarding the attestation extension.

For questions, please contact the QualityNet Help Desk 1-866-288-8912 or via email at Qnetsupport@hcqis.org from 7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Central Time. Complete information about PQRS is available at  http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Quality-Initiatives-Patient-Assessment-Instruments/PQRS/index.html.

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Using templates in your EHR? Make sure they are updated for ICD-10!

The follow article, written by Cathie Wilde pertains to any EHR that is “template driven”.  As we approach (hopefully) adoption of ICD-10 codes, looking at how your templates are coded is one of those great first steps a practice can take to begin it’s transition to ICD-10.

 Published from ICD-10 monitor:
 “Templates can either enhance documentation necessary for coding and data quality, or they can hinder things by restricting options and failing to prompt physicians to document specific information. However, templates cannot be overlooked when it comes to ICD-10. This is particularly true if a hospital relies more heavily on templates to capture structured data. Many hospitals may use templates for certain diagnoses, orders, or visit types and allow physicians to dictate information for everything else.

Regardless of a hospital’s specific use of templates, one point remains clear: the templates must be updated to accommodate the details necessary for ICD-10. At a minimum, these details include laterality, specificity, and etiology. The number of physicians who could be using a specific template at any given time — or even over a short period of time — could be significant. If one template is not updated correctly to accommodate ICD-10, data quality and reimbursement could be compromised.

Health information management (HIM) directors cannot assume that electronic health record (EHR) vendors will handle this effectively and in a timely manner. Instead, take the following steps to ensure that all updates will be made:

1. Take an inventory of all current templates in use. Are some of these templates used more frequently than others? Can any of them be retired if not in use? Ask for input from coders — what information is typically missing from the templates? Can you add or revise this information during the ICD-10 update? Work with your EHR vendor to make these changes before tackling ICD-10 updates.

2. Form a committee to address ICD-10 template updates. This committee, which can be a subcommittee of the ICD-10 implementation committee, should include coders, clinical documentation improvement (CDI) specialists, a physician champion, and an EHR representative. Compile a list of all diagnoses and procedures that require greater specificity in ICD-10 and cross-check this list with any templates that are in use. Ensure that each and every reference to these diagnoses and procedures is updated to accommodate ICD-10 specificity and other requirements.

3. Tie your template update efforts to your query update efforts. As CDI specialists review queries to ensure the implementation of updates for ICD-10, they can easily use this information to review templates in light of ICD-10 changes. If templates ultimately capture all of the relevant information that coders need, a query may not even be necessary.

4. Review templates after updates have been made. Set a deadline for all template updates to be completed. Then manually review each template to ensure that updates have been entered correctly.

5. Educate physicians. Physicians don’t need template-specific training; however, let physicians know that the updated templates exist when performing specialty-specific ICD-10 training. Reiterate that the templates exist to make physicians’ jobs easier by prompting them to document what’s necessary and pertinent to ICD-10 in the most concise way.

Clinical areas for review

Consider focusing on the following templates that require new and more specific documentation in ICD-10:

Obstetrics-related templates

  • Specific trimester: The majority of codes in Chapter 15 (Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Puerperium) feature a final character that indicates the trimester of the pregnancy. Assignment of this character is based on the provider’s documentation of the patient’s trimester during the admission/encounter. Templates should include the weeks of gestation at the time of admission and/or delivery.
  • Fetus identification: ICD-10 requires a seventh character to denote multiple gestations, when applicable. This character identifies the fetus for which the complication code applies. Templates should provide an option for this character.
  • Multiple gestation placenta status: ICD-10 features a combination code for multiple gestation and identification of the number of placentas and amniotic sacs. Templates should capture this information as well.

Trauma-related templates

  • Glascow coma scale: This scale denotes the degree of consciousness and is used commonly with head trauma cases. The score can function as an indicator for testing or treatment as well as predict the duration and outcome of the coma. Templates for head injuries should specifically include this information.
  • Gustilo classification: This classification applies to open fractures of the long bones, including the humerus, radius, ulna, femur, tibia, and fibula. The classification system groups open fractures into three main categories and three subcategories defined by these characteristics: mechanism of injury, extent of soft tissue damage, and degree of bone injury or involvement. Templates for open fractures should include this information.
  • Salter-Harris classification: This classification includes nine types of fractures that occur along the epiphyseal (growth) plates in bones that have not reached full maturity. With these types of fractures, plates are still open and filled with cartilaginous tissue. These fractures are common among children. Templates for these fractures should include information related to the Salter-Harris classification system.

Wound-related templates

  • Severity: In addition to specific location and etiology of non-pressure skin ulcers, ICD-10 also requires physicians to document the severity of the ulcer as follows:
    • Limited to breakdown of skin
    • With fat layer exposed
    • With necrosis of muscle
    • With necrosis of bone

Any and all wound templates should include these designations. Pressure ulcer templates should continue to include the stage of the ulcer.

Nutrition templates

  • Obesity: In addition to the current body mass index documentation on nutrition orders/templates for obesity, ICD-10 includes additional codes for obesity due to excess calories, drug-induced obesity, and morbid obesity with alveolar hypoventilation. Templates should be updated to include these designations. “

About the Author

Cathie Wilde, RHIA, CCS, is the director of coding services for MRA. Ms. Wilde has been active in the healthcare industry for more than 30 years. Her previous positions have included assistant director of HIM, DRG coordinator at the Massachusetts Hospital Association, and DRG validator at Blue Cross Blue Shield. She has extensive experience in ICD-9-CM and CPT coding, auditing, data analysis, development and testing of coding products, specialized reporting, and in-service training. As director she is responsible for overseeing the coding division, providing the strategic direction of MRA as a local industry leader of quality coding, auditing, and denial management services. Ms. Wilde is an American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA)-approved ICD-10-CM/PCS trainer.

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New CMS rule allows flexibility in certified EHR technology for 2014

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) published a final rule on August 29, 2014, that allows health care providers more flexibility in how they use certified electronic health record (EHR) technology (CEHRT) to meet meaningful use for an EHR Incentive Program reporting period for 2014. By providing this flexibility, more providers will be able to participate and meet important meaningful use objectives like drug interaction and drug allergy checks, providing clinical summaries to patients, electronic prescribing, reporting on key public health data and reporting on quality measures.

“We listened to stakeholder feedback and provided CEHRT flexibility for 2014 to help ensure providers can continue to participate in the EHR Incentive Programs forward,” said Marilyn Tavenner, CMS administrator. “We were excited to see that there is overwhelming support for this change.”

Based on public comments and feedback from stakeholders, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) identified ways to help eligible professionals, eligible hospitals, and critical access hospitals (CAHs) implement and meaningfully use Certified EHR Technology. Specifically, eligible providers can use the 2011 Edition CEHRT or a combination of 2011 and 2014 Edition CEHRT for an EHR reporting period in 2014 for the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs; All eligible professionals, eligible hospitals, and CAHs are required to use the 2014 Edition CEHRT in 2015.

These updates to the EHR Incentive Programs support HHS’ commitment to implementing an effective health information technology infrastructure that elevates patient-centered care, improves health outcomes, and supports the providers that care for patients.

The rule also finalizes the extension of Stage 2 through 2016 for certain providers and announces the Stage 3 timeline, which will begin in 2017 for providers who first became meaningful EHR users in 2011 or 2012.

See the full press release here:  http://cms.gov/Newsroom/MediaReleaseDatabase/Press-releases/2014-Press-releases-items/2014-08-29.html

See the EHR Incentive Programs 2014 CEHRT Ruke: Quick Guide here:  http://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Legislation/EHRIncentivePrograms/Downloads/CEHRT2014_FinalRule_QuickGuide.pdf

See the CEHRT Flexibility Decision Tool here:  http://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Legislation/EHRIncentivePrograms/Downloads/CEHRT_Rule_DecisionTool.pdf

Kelly Meeks

Sunrise Services, LLC

http://www.sunrize.com

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Does the July 1, 2014 MU deadline apply to you?

Are you a bit confused on whether or not you should file an exception this year?  And what about that July 1, 2014 “deadline” fast approaching? 

With so much money…..both in incentives received and fear of losing money due to audits and penalties, we’ve summarized some information surrounding this “deadline” and what it may (or may not) mean for you and your practice.

New participants in 2014

If you are new to the program and intended to demonstrate meaningful use for the first time in 2014, but you are not able to implement 2014 certified EHR technology for the 2014 reporting year, you may apply for a hardship exception for the 2015 payment adjustment.  

An interactive tool is available to help you determine if you will avoid upcoming 2015 and 2016 Medicare EHR Incentive Program payment adjustments by demonstrating meaningful use, or if you should apply for a hardship exception.  The deadline to do this is JULY 1, 2014.  Please bear in mind that if you are a returning eligible professional, you will not need to file an exemption for 2014.

Applying for Hardship Exception When submitting hardship exception applications, entries must include supporting documentation that proves demonstrating meaningful use presented significant hardship.

CMS has posted hardship exception applications on the EHR website for:

Please read and follow the submission instructions on the application. Note that all required supporting documentation must be included at the time of submission. Completing your application online and submitting it electronically to EHRhardship@provider-resources.com, with all required supporting documentation, will reduce the application processing time. Please do not submit hand-written applications.

Hardship Exception Tip sheets You can also avoid payment adjustments by successfully demonstrating meaningful use prior to the payment adjustment.  Tip sheets are available on the CMS website that outline when eligible professionals must demonstrate meaningful use in order to avoid the payment adjustments.

Returning meaningful users in 2014

If you successfully demonstrated meaningful use for the 2013 reporting year, you will not be subject to the 2015 payment adjustment.  If you are not able to implement 2014 certified EHR technology for a 2014 reporting period, you may apply for a hardship for the 2016 payment adjustment.

  • Use the eligible professional hardship exception for 2016 which will be available after July 1, 2014
  • Indicate that you are applying for a hardship because of 2014 vendor issues
  • Submit your application by July 1, 2015

 Want more information about the EHR Incentive Programs? Make sure to visit the Medicare and Medicaid EHR Incentive Programs website for the latest news and updates on the EHR Incentive Programs.

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Why this doctor loves electronic medical records

Medisoft Clinical is a fully integrated EMR system.

Dr. Jen Gunter

There is a recent and interesting piece in the Washington Post by an orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Craviotto, about the maddening aspect of forced mandates and bureaucratic requirements in medicine that seem to have very little to do with actual medical care and more about hoops through which we must jump that seemingly lead to nowhere.

While I do find the bureaucracy of medicine in the United States insane versus the Canadian system (for example) I was interested in Dr. Craviotto’s take on the burden of the forced electronic health record (EHR) mandate and the time that doctors spend filling out “unnecessary fields” to satisfy regulatory measures. Dr. Craviotto writes that his isn’t an unique complaint, quoting a study commissioned by the American Medical Association that identified “Poor EHR usability, time-consuming data entry, interference with face-to-face patient care, inefficient and less fulfilling work content, inability to exchange health information between EHR products, and…

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